Author: raghu

Dancing at Jeena

About the Disorder ————Young children with this disorder struggle to regulate their
emotions and behaviors as well as their motor abilities in
response to sensory stimulation. The sensory stimulation can
include touch, sight, sound, taste, smell, sensation of
movement in space, and awareness of the position of one’s
body in space. A child’s struggle with these sensory inputs
leads to impairment in their development and functioning.
These children have trouble maintaining a calm, alert, or
affectedly positive state.

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Spotlight on Jeena

Parent Child Interaction Therapy is a parent-training program developed by Dr.Sheila Eyeberg and colleagues to treat children with conduct problem behavior and their families. The treatment is designed to help parents build a warm and responsive relationship with their child and to help parents manage their child’s behavior more effectively. Parent child Interaction Therapy is based on the assumption that improving the parent child interaction will result in improvement in both child and family functioning.

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Video Links for Sensory Integration

This article talks about facilitating oral motor development in children with oral motor/sensory deficits.

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The Rainbow Behind The Spectrum

Jeena is partnering with ICC again to participate in Sevathon 2011

Date: July 17th 2011
Time: 7.30 am to 1pm
Venue: Baylands Park, Sunnyvale, CA

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Jeena Voted Top Rated Non-Profit in 2010

Jeena empowers individuals with developmental disabilities and their family so as to enhance their quality of life. Our programs focus on building productive capacity, emotional regulation through friendships and sports and providing information and supports to parents. We are a self-help group of parents.
Jeena is a culturally sensitive group. We are primarily parents of South-Asian Community. Everyone is welcome to participate in classes, workshops and events at Jeena.

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IPhone and IPad Apps for AT and AAC

Information about MediCal from Department of Developmental Services

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Communication Disorder

A B S T R AC T The developmental, individual-difference, relationship based model (DIR), a theoretical and applied framework for comprehensive intervention, examines the functional developmental capacities of children in the context of their unique biologically based processing profile and their family relationships and interactive patterns. As a functional approach, it uses the complex interactions between biology and experience to understand behavior and articulates the developmental capacities that provide the foundation for higher order symbolic thinking and relating. During spontaneous ‘floor time’ play sessions, adults follow the child’s lead utilizing affectively toned interactions through gestures and words to move the child up the symbolic ladder by first establishing a foundation of shared attention, engagement, simple and complex gestures, and problem solving to usher the child into the world of ideas and abstract thinking. This process is illustrated by a case example of a young boy on the autism spectrum interacting with his father during ‘floor time’ over a 3 year period.

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Jeena – A bond to Cherish

By Linda Groves Gillespie and Nancy L. Seibel
What is self-regulation and why is it important? In the report From Neurons to Neighborhoods: The Science of Early Childhood Development, Shonkoff and Phillips (2000) define self-regulation as a child’s ability to gain control of bodily functions, manage powerful emotions, and maintain focus and attention. The growth of self-regulation is a cornerstone of early childhood development and is visible in all areas of behavior (Shonkoff & Phillips 2000). When caring for an infant or toddler, parents and caregivers act as extensions of or supports for the child’s internal ability to regulate. The adults put a young baby’s pacifier back in her mouth, provide a soft blanket for a toddler falling asleep, and use consistent routines to support self regulation by helping very young children know what to expect. Feeding is one example of a daily routine that adults structure for infants and toddlers. The feeding process requires several aspects of self-regulation. Physically, it requires a baby to suck, swallow, and breathe. Emotionally, a baby’s cries signal her distressed reaction to hunger. Cognitively, a baby attends to the task of feeding long enough to become full. Imagine the three scenarios that follow.

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Helpful Web Sites

There’s been a lot of news recently about efforts to detect signs of autism in children earlier — even before age 2, which is when doctors typically make the first diagnosis based on toddlers’ behavior and development. Now a new study sheds light on another key issue — why autistic children tend to develop larger brains than those without the condition.

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Websites for Speech and Language Development

Common vision problems and their description

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